According To Freud The Superego Acts As Your

Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, developed a groundbreaking theory of personality that included the concept of the superego. The superego is one of the three components of the human psyche, along with the id and the ego. It plays a crucial role in shaping our behavior, thoughts, and moral values.

What is the Superego?

The superego is the part of the psyche that reflects internalized moral and ethical standards that are typically learned from one’s parents or society. It serves as the conscience of the individual, enforcing moral standards and striving for perfection. The superego is often seen as the opposite of the id, which operates on the pleasure principle, seeking immediate gratification of desires.

Functions of the Superego

The superego acts as a guiding force in our decision-making processes, influencing our actions, thoughts, and feelings. It serves several key functions, including:

  • Enforcing Moral Standards: The superego internalizes societal norms and values, acting as a moral compass that guides our behavior.
  • Striving for Perfection: The superego sets high standards of behavior and constantly pushes for perfection, leading to feelings of guilt and self-criticism when these standards are not met.
  • Regulating Social Behavior: The superego helps us conform to societal expectations and norms, ensuring that we behave in socially acceptable ways.
  • Resolving Conflicts: The superego mediates between the id’s impulses and the ego’s rationality, helping to resolve internal conflicts and maintain balance within the psyche.

The Development of the Superego

Freud believed that the superego develops during the phallic stage of psychosexual development, typically between the ages of three to six years old. During this stage, children become aware of their gender identity and develop an attachment to their same-sex parent. The superego is formed through the internalization of the moral values and standards of the parents, as well as societal norms.

Freud also identified two components within the superego: the conscience and the ego-ideal. The conscience represents the internalized rules and prohibitions that the individual has learned, while the ego-ideal represents the aspirations and goals that the individual strives to achieve.

Impact of the Superego on Behavior

The superego exerts a significant influence on our behavior, guiding us to act in accordance with moral standards and societal expectations. When the superego is overdeveloped or overly harsh, it can lead to feelings of guilt, low self-esteem, and perfectionism. On the other hand, an underdeveloped superego can result in impulsive and socially inappropriate behavior.

Key Points:

  • The superego is the part of the psyche that reflects internalized moral and ethical standards.
  • It serves as the conscience of the individual, enforcing moral standards and striving for perfection.
  • The superego develops during the phallic stage of psychosexual development, typically between the ages of three to six years old.
  • It plays a crucial role in shaping our behavior, thoughts, and moral values.

Conclusion

In conclusion, according to Freud, the superego acts as the moral conscience of the individual, enforcing internalized moral standards and striving for perfection. It plays a crucial role in shaping our behavior, thoughts, and moral values, influencing our decision-making processes and guiding us to act in accordance with societal norms and expectations.

Understanding the functions and development of the superego can provide valuable insights into human behavior and help individuals navigate the complexities of their psyche. By recognizing the influence of the superego, we can cultivate a greater awareness of our moral values and strive for personal growth and self-improvement.

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